Talking Past, Present, and Future of Socialism on Radio America

Liberty Nation has been running a series of articles lately on socialism, and they have been pretty popular. As a result, Liberty Nation and Tim Donner spoke with me and a couple of other authors about the past, present, and future of socialism on Radio America.

I recently did a series on socialism for LN (SEE: Why Socialism Failed: A New Liberty Nation Weekly Series).

Here is the interview (skip to 10:30):

21 Things That Make Life Worth Living

This weekend, I was watching (or trying to anyway if the twins were quiet) Woody Allen’s classic 1979 motion picture, “Manhattan.” It is definitely one of my favorite Allen films, and sometimes I think it is superior to “Annie Hall.”

Anyway, there is an iconic scene that features Allen’s character list what makes life worth living.

Considering how I don’t feel so hot from the permanent cloud cast over the city and living on 3.5 hours of sleep every day, it got me thinking to make a list that would perhaps boost my mood.

So, here are 21 things that make life worth living (in no particular order):

1. Murder mysteries (preferably Agatha Christie and Raymond Chandler)

2. Tim Hortons’ apple fritters and dark roast coffee

3. Johann Strauss’s “Wiener Blut”

4. Classic movies (anything from the silent era to the mid-1960s)

5. Opera

6. Royal gala apples

7. Autumn weather (cloudy, cool, rainy)

8. The Boston Red Sox

9. October baseball (or fall ball)

10. William F. Buckley’s “Firing Line”

11. Suspense Radio

12. Sushi Gen, a Japanese restaurant in uptown Toronto

13. Strawberry Nice Cream (Vega protein powder)

14. My wife’s cooking

15. Walking during spring sunsets

16. Jazz FM’s Big Band Sunday Night (only when Glenn Woodcock plays vintage swing and jazz until the 1950s)

17. Mid-afternoon naps

18. The Marx Brothers

19. “Seinfeld”

20. “The Simpsons”

21. Crosswords

Talking the Myth of the Anti-War Democrats on Radio America

To kick off 2019 with a bang, I posted an article on Liberty Nation, titled “The Great Myth Of The Anti-War Left Expose,” in which I discuss how the Democratic Party and overall left is not opposed to war and is actually in favor of it.

The piece went viral, appearing on dozens of different websites. It also garnered the attention of Radio America host Greg Corombos.

Here is my appearance on his program:

Listen to “The Myth of Anti-War Democrats” on Spreaker.https://widget.spreaker.com/widgets.js

Exposing Political Clichés – A New Liberty Nation Series (updated)

Now that my Why Socialism Failed and Saul Alinsky series are over, I have launched a new one just in time for the busy U.S. Democratic primary season over at Liberty Nation.

Titled “Exposing Political Clichés,” I take a look at the standard tropes that politicians employ. The first one I examined was the poverty is a virtue, wealth is a sin philosophy.

Here is an excerpt:

One of the more popular tropes among those seeking the White House, or any public office for that matter, is informing everyone how impoverished they were growing up. Or, at the very least, their humble beginnings.

If you haven’t noticed it, this is how the presidential hopeful on the debate stage typically does it:

“Thanks for that question on small business, Anderson. Well, as you know, I was brought up in a family of eight, living in a two-room shack in Biloxi, MS. My father tried to live the American dream by starting his own business, repairing dolls – he called it A Doll’s House. We didn’t eat very much, relying on roadkill for dinner and rain for our water consumption. My mother was a sick woman, my two brothers had lice, and my sisters suffered from Dr. Strangelove Syndrome. So, yes, I was so poor as a kid. Now, to your question: No, I would not agree to a 5% tax increase on employers with fewer than ten employees.”

This may be an exaggeration, but it is a strategy you can expect to see as the primaries heat up. Minorities – Sen. Cory Booker (D-NY), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) – will talk about how racism tried to oppress them. The wealthy white candidates, like former Vice President Joe Biden and Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-TX), will brag about how they went to the bathroom in an outhouse and ate raw carrots for breakfast. Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg will reveal how hard it was to find a new chauffeur.

You can read more here.

Here are the other titles:

 

Was 1999 the Best Year in Cinema? Nope – Try 1950

The National Post recently ran this headline: “Was 1999 the best year in movies? TIFF correctly says yes.”

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) Bell Lightbox is running a retrospective honoring films from 1999. You might remember that this was the year for “The Sixth Sense,” “The Matrix,” “Fight Club,” “Being John Malkovich,” “Eyes Wide Shut,” and “The Talented Mr. Ripley.” (“Purple Noon” was far superior to the Matt Damn movie.)

Because of this, these experts claim that 1999 was the best year in film history.

I beg to differ.

There are so many other years that have produced excellent motion pictures.

Interestingly enough, if you type in “best year in cinema” on Google, then 1939 comes up. The top films from that year were “Ninotchka,” “Stagecoach,” “The Wizard of Oz,” “Dark Victory,” “Gone with the Wind,” and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.”

While these are excellent films, there was even a better year for motion pictures: 1950.

These were some of the pictures you could see at your local cinema house in the United States:

– “The Third Man”

– “All About Eve”

– “Sunset Boulevard”

– “White Heat”

– “The Asphalt Jungle”

– “Harvey”

– “No Way Out”

– “Woman on the Run”

– “Night and the City”

– “Stage Fright”

– “Last Holiday”

– “Where the Sidewalk Ends”

What a way to kick off the new decade.

While 1999 may have delivered some good films, 1950 was even better. And, of course, you can find so many great pictures from the dawn of sound until the film school revolution of the 1960s/1970s.

If you ever need to commence your journey into film, then you travel back to 1950, not 1999.